Apr 30

IMF Chief Calls for Mortgage Principle Forgiveness in U.S.

International Monetary Fund Chief Christine Legarde has added her voice to the growing chorus of economists not bought and and paid for by the banking sector in calling for the United States to begin to reduce the principal on underwater mortgages purchased during the fraudulent run-up in housing prices between 2002 and 2008. She recommends doing so in order to stimulate growth across the globe, but doing so would also significantly impact the economy at home.

She called upon Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, both of which are overseen by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, to reduce the principal owed on homes, whether the homeowner is in arrears on payments or simply underwater and current in their obligations. Unfortunately, FHFA boss Edward DeMarco has steadfastly maintained that he will not support policies that allow for widespread mortgage write-downs. Mr. DeMarco was to make a decision by April 30, 2012 whether or not he would move forward on a plan under Obama’s HAMP program to allow principal reductions on properties backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac where the mortgage holder is seriously delinquent. Unfortunately Mr. DeMarco recently announced that he would ignore the deadline, imposed by Congress, and continue to study the problem.

The HAMP program reductions that are under consideration by Mr. DeMarco would only affect about 10% of all underwater mortgages backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac because homeowners who are underwater but continuing to make timely payments are not eligible for reductions. Mr. DeMarco has said in the past that he fears mass purposeful mortgage delinquencies if the program is permitted to move forward, a prospect that has not been supported by evidence. The likelihood of damaging ones credit rating and potentially losing a home in exchange for a principal reduction that may or may not come at all has not convinced any significant number of borrowers to stop making their mortgage payments.

The Obama administration has been reported as putting pressure on Mr. DeMarco to make a decision allowing the contemplated principal reductions to move forward, but I am dubious as to how extraordinary the insistence has truly been from the White House. The administration has offered a deluge of failed and ill-conceived fixes to the mortgage mess since 2008, none of which truly aimed at forcing the banks and Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to allow principal write-downs of underwater properties. A wisely constructed plan by the FHFA and the administration could easily limit any reductions to those homes actually purchased during the fraudulent run-up in home prices, and those homes who value exceeds that of the original mortgage, excluding refinancing undertaken to make additional unnecessary purchases. Configuring a program to address this problem and stimulate the economy would not be a herculean task.

It is wholly objectionable that the already incommensurate principal reductions proposed by Congress and the President are being insubordinately rejected. However, it should come as no surprise to anyone given the administration’s posture concerning this problem from the very beginning. Setting aside the earlier mentioned waterfall of half-assed programs previously concocted, the furthest the President has been willing to travel down the write-down road has been to propose federally assisted and voluntary refinancing of a small number of homes under lower interest rates. Not a single legitimate attempt has been made to reduce the principal of homes currently in repayment and dramatically underwater. Offering a homeowner the ability to pay twice the value of a home under a lower interest rate is no program at all. It is an insult to each American who had their tax dollars spent drowning large banks and mortgage institutions in liquidity in order to ensure their solvency.

So, Mr. DeMarco, no one is surprised by your decision. Further, only a fool should be surprised by the administration’s lack of movement on this issue. You’re a homeowner, not a bank, and as such, you don’t matter. The most logical course of action is to walk away from any home that is seriously underwater, because help is not coming.

Christine Legarde was right to call upon the American government to offer significant principal reductions to underwater homeowners. She is right because it will boost the American economy, setting free cash to be spent consuming goods and services and alleviating business and personal uncertainty. She is right because it will boost the world economy. She is right because it represents remuneration for the fraud perpetrated upon the people. She is right, quite simply, because it is the moral thing to do.